Cliffs of Moher2
Cliffs of Moher2

Cliffs of Moher Coastal Walk Repaired

Clare County Council has made improvements to the Cliffs of Moher coastal walk, a 13-km (8-mile) trail that runs along the cliffs from Doolin to Hag's Head offering incredible views of the ocean and surrounding area.

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The Cliffs of Moher coastal walk. Photo: Dimitry Anikin, Pexels.

During an inspection of the trail late in 2020, the Council discovered several high-risk areas due to active landslide systems and as a result, a section of the path north of O’Brien’s Tower was closed.

The fear was that the trail could destabilize at some locations, making it unsafe for walkers.

As a result, visitors to the Cliffs of Moher were urged to stay within the confines of the official site and forego using the trail.

Views like this can be seen from the Cliffs of Moher Coastal Walk. Photo: Tourism Ireland.

The work was conducted within a two-kilometer zone, one kilometer north and one kilometer south of the Visitor Centre.

The work included resurfacing the existing gravel path, the repair of stone stiles, as well as the repair and restoration of the existing flagstone and traditional stone walls.

Additional upgrades included the installation of a pedestrian tunnel.

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One of Ireland's Most Popular Attractions

The Cliffs of Moher is among Ireland's most popular visited attractions, with approximately 1.5 million people going there each year.

stones near green fields Burren Eco Tourism Network
The unique Burren landscape. Photo courtesy of MN Studio.

Located on the southwestern edge of the Burren, an area famous for its dramatic limestone landscape, the cliffs rise to approximately 702 feet (214 meters) at their highest point and continue for 8 km (5 miles) over the Atlantic Ocean.

The Cliffs of Moher are a Signature Discovery Point along Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

An aerial shot of Loop Head Peninsula, Co. Clare. Photo: Feraghus Foyle for Failte Ireland.

You can see the Aran Islands from there, as well as the Maumturks and Twelve Pins mountain ranges in County Galway, and Loop Head in Co. Clare to the south.

On a visit to the Cliffs of Moher, your first stop should be at the visitor center.

Constructed in 2007 into a nearby hillside, the Cliffs of Moher center includes a number of exhibitions that bring the story of the cliffs to life.

The interior of the Cliffs of Moher Visitor Centre. Photo: Irish Fireside, https://www.flickr.com/photos/irishfireside/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The interactive media displays cover the geology, history, as well as the flora and fauna of the cliffs.

A large multimedia screen shows a bird's eye’s view of the cliffs and an underwater video shows the caves that lie several hundred feet below.

sunset over the ocean with a cliff tower nearby the Cliffs of Moher
O'Brien's Tower on the Cliffs of Moher. Photo: Niall Cosgrove for Failte Ireland/Tourism Ireland.

A popular landmark along the cliffs is O’Brien’s Tower, which marks their highest point.

The tower was built in 1835 by a local landlord and Member of Parliament Sir Cornelius O’Brien as an observation tower for English tourists visiting the area.

You can get a different perspective of the Cliffs of Moher by taking a cruise from nearby Doolin.

A cruise boat at the base of the cliffs. Photo: By JackOfAllTrades at English Wikipedia, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=36865274

The hour-long excursion is available from mid-March through the end of October.

Audio commentary is offered in English, French, German, Spanish, and Italian.

While you’re in the area, be sure to explore the Burren landscape, a UNESCO Global Geopark.

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The limestone formations in this area of Co. Clare is in stark contrast to Ireland’s more familiar green fields, but no less beautiful and truly a sight to behold.

The Burren is actually part of the Burren National Park, one of six protected regions in Ireland.

a large stone Cliffs of Moher Coastal Walk
The Poulnabrone Dolmen is prominently located on the Burren in Co. Clare. Photo: Carina Chen.

Its limestone landscape was formed as sediments in a tropical sea that covered Ireland approximately 350 million years ago.

This is why you’ll see the remains of ancient inhabitants of that tropical sea, including corals, sea urchins, sea lilies, and ammonites.

There are several ancient monuments to be found here as well, the most familiar and much-photographed one is the Poulnabrone Dolmen.

Free guided walks are available during the summer season.

The seven-way-marked walking trails in the park will give you a more concise view of the landscape.

The walks vary in length, from a 30-minute looped walk to a three-hour trek.

Photo courtesy of the Burren National Park.

There is no visitor center in the park, although you will find information at the Burren Centre in Kilfenora.

The exhibits there are well worth checking out.

The Burren Tea Rooms and a craft shop are also on the premises.

If you’re visiting the Cliffs of Moher this year, be sure to book tickets online as the attraction can only accommodate a limited amount of people due to Covid-19 restrictions.

Read More: The Burren Experience, an Ireland on a Budget Tourism Ambassador

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