Derry Cityscape
Derry Cityscape

City of Derry Visitor Pass Launched

A new City of Derry visitor pass has been launched that will give tourists discounted entry to 10 hand-picked tourist attractions and activities.

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The pass provides discounted access to The Guildhall, the Tower Museum, the Siege Museum, and the Museum of Free Derry.

Tours of the city’s cathedrals and churches as well as access to guided walking tours are also part of the new pass initiative.

The pass is valid for either one or two days and is available for download to a smartphone or other device.

When you buy the pass, you will automatically receive a Visit Derry map, along with local tips and offers to help you make the most of your visit.

The Visit Derry Pass is the first of its kind to be launched in Northern Ireland.

Passes can be purchased online or in person at the city’s Visitor Information Centre. 

Here are some of what you can expect during a visit to the city.

Derry City Walls

Derry (known also as Londonderry) is the only remaining completely walled city in Ireland and one of the finest examples of a walled city in all of Europe.

The Derry City walls. Photo courtesy of Tourism Ireland.

The walls, which measure 26 feet high by 30 feet wide (7.92 meters by 9.144 meters), form a mile-long walkway around the inner city.

From there, you’ll have a bird’s eye view of the original Renaissance-style street plan developed in the 17th century to offer protection for the Scottish and English residents who moved to Derry as part of the Plantation of Ulster.

The walls are a mile in circumference and contain seven gates.

They include the Ferryquay Gate, which is the oldest gate; Shipquay Gate, Bishop’s Gate, and Butcher’s Gate, which are part of the original four gates; New Gate, which was built in the 1790s and reinforced in 1798; Castle Gate, built between 1805 and 1808; and Magazine Gate, constructed in 1888 and giving direct access to the riverfront.

The cannons on Derry City Walls. Photo: Gardiner Mitchell, Tourism Ireland.

The Derry walls have the largest collection of cannons in Europe, including two from the Elizabethan era, one of which contains a Tudor rose embedded into the cannon in 1590.

The Derry Girls mural. Photo; Gardner Mitchell for Tourism Ireland.

From the walls, you’ll also catch a glimpse of Badger’s Bar and the large “Derry Girls” mural on the side of the building.

The Guildhall

Another popular tourist attraction in Derry is the impressive neo-Gothic Guildhall, constructed in 1890.

Today it is used by elected members of the Derry and Strabane District Council.

a large ornate building City of Derry visitor pass
The beautiful Guildhall building in Derry. Photo: Tourism Northern Ireland.

The current building was preceded by the Market House built in the 17th century. It was later destroyed during the Siege of Derry in 1689.

The current building was completed in 1890. Its clock tower was modeled on the Elizabeth Tower in London.

The building was severely damaged in 1972 after two bombs went off in the building. It was restored and reopened in 1977.

stained glass window City of Derry visitor pass
The Great War Memorial stained glass window in the Guildhall Derry. Photo: Andreas Borchert, Wikimedia Commons.

The most striking feature of the Guildhall is its beautiful stained-glass windows, which were damaged in the bomb attacks. They were subsequently restored.

The windows tell the story of the city from its earliest times to the recent past and are well worth a look.



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The Tower Museum

This museum, located within a historic tower beside the city walls, is a must-see if you are interested in the city’s prehistoric origins.

displays in a museum City of Derry visitor pass
The Tower Museum in Derry, one of 10 attractions you can see at a discounted rate with the new City of Derry visitor pass. Photo: Tourism Northern Ireland.

Two interesting exhibits include An Armada Shipwreck: La Trinidad Valencera and The Story of Derry.

The Armada exhibition tells the story of the fleet’s largest ship that sank in 1588 off the coast of Co. Donegal and the soldiers and sailors who were onboard. It was discovered nearly 400 years later by local divers.

Be sure to go to the fifth floor to see a replica of a 16th-century tower house.

Other popular pitstops for visitors include the Craft Village in the city center and Walled City Brewery.

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